5 Best Taiwanese Foods For Hangovers

Hangovers are a sad fact of life that all adults must accept. What’s worse is that the older we get, the more awful the hangover becomes. I swear I could write a book entitled Judith and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Hangover (Give yourself a pat on the back if you understood that reference).

Back in college, a cup of ramen and a lemon-lime Gatorade was all I needed to survive the dreadful “Sunday Hangover,” which always showed up after a fun Saturday night. We’ve all been there. You know those Sundays when you pray to any gods who are sticking by you despite your ridiculous behavior the night before. You beg forgiveness and offer your first born in exchange of the relief from the pounding in your head.

In Taiwan, there’s no need to go to such extremes because the cure to your dilemma is right outside your door. That cure is food, delicious Taiwanese food. The food is so good it has magical healing powers. Just don’t quote me on that last promise.

1. Beef Noodle Soup (Niu rou Mein)

beef noodle soupThis amazing savory soup is the perfect mix of comfort food and healthy food. Ok, it’s not really healthy, but it’s far better than a greasy cheeseburger! The tender chunks of beef along with the thick slurpy noodles are all tossed into a hot and flavorful broth, making a delicious hangover cure. This is a soup that makes you feel better, but still fills up your belly so you’re not hungry an hour later. Yeah, I’m talking to you, makers of Campbell’s Chicken Noodle Soup. Put some more noodles and chicken in your soup, Campbell’s!

This is a soup that makes you feel better, but still fills up your belly so you’re not hungry an hour later. Yeah, I’m talking to you, makers of Campbell’s Chicken Noodle Soup. Put some more noodles and chicken in your soup, Campbell’s!

2. Soup Dumplings (Xiao long bao)

小龙包 Xiao Long Bao - Din Tai Fung AUD8.80It might just be the soy sauce, spices, and vinegar concoction that you create yourself to dip your soup dumplings in, but these little babies are a surefire way to rid yourself of any drunken side effects fast. My personally preferred spot to get these is Din Tai Fung. I don’t care that it’s a crazy popular chain because it’s crazy good! Just be sure to go extra early if you plan on trying Din Tai Fung because you might have to fight off a herd of other people looking to cure their own hangovers.

I personally preferred to get these from Din Tai Fung. I don’t care that it’s a crazy popular chain because it’s crazy good! Just be sure to go extra early if you plan on trying Din Tai Fung because you might have to fight off a herd of other people looking to cure their own hangovers.

3. Taiwan Hamburger (Gua Bao)

Taiwanese Pork BunAlso known as Pork Belly Buns, Taiwanese Hamburgers are a way better cure-all than the little pathetic ketchup globbed double cheeseburgers you’ll find at McDonald’s.

Steaming Chinese buns are filled with hot braised pork and varying on where you buy them, are topped with delicious extras like peanut powder, cilantro, and spices.

4. Scallion Pancakes (Cong Zhua bing)

scallion pancakeThe perfect grab and go Taiwan street food, scallion pancakes are made with eggs, onion, flour, and (if you like) cheese.

Made best on the stands in the streets, scallion pancakes cost about a dollar and are the perfect Sunday breakfast to grab when you’re on your way out to meet your friends for mimosas (you naughty expat!). For extra gluttony be sure to add bacon.

5. Spicy Hot Pot (Shabu Shabu)

Hot potBest eaten with good friends and good conversation, spicy hot pot is a steaming pot of broth in which you dip and cook a variety of meats and vegetables. There’s something about the savory scents filling the restaurant and good proteins that instantly perk me up and make me feel better. What’s even better about shabu shabu in Taiwan is that most places have a flat price for all the meats and veggies you’d like, and even better, some serve ice cream as dessert. I seriously can’t think of a better hangover cure.

What’s even better about shabu shabu in Taiwan is that most places have a flat price for all the meats and veggies you’d like, and even better, some serve ice cream as dessert. I seriously can’t think of a better hangover cure.

If you live in Taiwan, what’s your favorite food cure for the hangover blues? Share your answer with other expats in a comment below!

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