Archive for the Advice for Living Abroad Category

Celebrating Christmas in Georgia

Celebrating Christmas in Georgia

Spending the holiday season in another country is the perfect way to really get to know that country’s culture and people. In the Republic of Georgia, Christmas celebrations contain plenty of familiar elements, as well as a number of traditions that are uniquely Georgian. The vast majority of the population in Georgia is Orthodox Christian. As such, Christmas is one of the most important holidays of the year. In the Orthodox world, the Julian calendar is still used in place of the Georgian calendar, meaning that Christmas falls on January 7th. On this day, large processions make their way through cities, towns, and villages throughout Georgia. These mass walks, called Alilo, are central to Georgia’s unique Christmas celebration. Banner-carrying clergy lead the processions, and men, women and children follow. Dressed as shepherds, soldiers, famous religious figures, or wearing traditional Georgian clothes, the procession members congratulate each other, and collect money for charities. Songs play an important role in the Christmas tradition in Georgia as well. Harmonious Georgian carols echo through the streets during the procession, and can also be heard in churches throughout the day. Although the songs vary from region to region, Georgian Christmas carols are solemn and beautiful. […]

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Celebrate Christmas in South Korea In Style

Celebrate Christmas in South Korea In Style

Celebrating Christmas abroad can be a challenge for new teachers and long-term expats. That’s why Reach To Teach’s Korea HR team has you covered for the holiday season. Here are some ideas on how to spend Christmas in South Korea. For teachers living in the Seoul area, check out: 1. Hollywood Grill Cost: 25,000Won per person Dinner is from 4pm to 8pm on December 25th and includes a glass of wine or beer. Secure your reservation at 02-749-1650 or throughhollywoodgrill1@hotmail.com. 2. Big Rock – Buffet Cost: 38,500 Won per person Dinner is from 6:30pm to 9:30 pm on December 25th and includes a drink of your choice. Contact info@bigrock.co.kr for more information. 3. Hyatt Regency Incheon – Buffet Cost: 50,000 per person Dinner is from 3pm to 5pm on December 25th. For reservations, please call 032-745-1234. Teachers in Busan can consider the following: 1. Wolfhound – Buffet Cost: 35,000 per person Christmas Dinner runs from 2pm to 5pm on December 25th. Reservations are required and limited to 90 people. Email wolfhoundbusan@gmail.com for more information. 2. Seaman’s Club – Buffet Cost: 26,350 Won per person An all-day Christmas buffet that runs from 11am to 9pm. Contact Mr. Kim at 010-3863-9638 to […]

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Top 10 Things to do in South Korea Outside of Seoul

Top 10 Things to do in South Korea Outside of Seoul

Spending a weekend, a day, or even a few hours getting away from the urban lifestyle can reinvigorate you can give you a glimpse of a whole different side of South Korea. Here are 10 things to do in Korea outside of Seoul.

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Travel Da Xing, a Suburb in Southern Beijing, China!

Travel Da Xing, a Suburb in Southern Beijing, China!

Here is a city guide to Da Xing, a suburb in Southern Beijing, China. Find out what attractions are on offer, what events you can get involved in, and what transportation is available.

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Taking The Next Step – A Teacher in South Korea Shares her Experiences of Moving Abroad

Taking The Next Step - A Teacher in South Korea Shares her Experiences of Moving Abroad

Guest Article by Uzma Ali, a Reach To Teach teacher in South Korea When I made the decision to leave my comfortable, unfulfilling life to start teaching English in Korea, I was excited at the prospect of having an adventure half way across the world. However, when the moment came to say goodbye to ‘home’ I can honestly say I have never felt such fear. The urge to run indoors and make my excuses was immense and stepping onto the train to London, Heathrow was quite possibly the hardest thing I have ever had to do. “What in God’s name am I doing?” I thought. The only thing I remember about that train journey was breathing deeply and whispering to myself, “Be brave, be brave, be brave,” as I watched the landscape fly by. Deciding to live in a different country – be it a few months, a year or even three years – is certainly not as easy as it may seem. Many people find the idea of living abroad enticing, but when push comes to shove and it’s time to make that final decision, the number of doubts that will go through your mind is unexpectedly high. In […]

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How To Survive Reverse Culture Shock

How To Survive Reverse Culture Shock

We all know what it feels like to walk into a new culture we know nothing about. Almost all of us have experienced culture shock. By the time we return to our home countries, the last thing on our mind is how different things might feel. You may have only been away for a year. Maybe you have been gone for 10 years, but one thing for certain is that it is easier to go to a new country then return to your home country! Here are some thoughts from our staff and teachers on reverse culture shock: “The first thing I noticed when I got home was that everything was expensive. After a year of living in Asia you start to take for granted how much lower the cost of living is. It takes a few weeks to get used to paying five dollars for a loaf of bread and tipping at every restaurant. The second biggest trial was the waste. You quickly become aware how much we westerners waste after spending time abroad. The other tests of the reverse culture shocked traveler, in my case, were readjusting to being around people en masse all the time, and speaking […]

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Teaching in China? Don’t Freak Out When…

China can be an out-of-this-world experience and many people aren’t prepared for some of things they might encounter in the Middle Kingdom. So, if you’re teaching in China, please don’t freak out when… people stare someone of the same gender holds your hand or asks you to dance (this is a sign of friendship) you wash your clothes for the first time and your rinse water is black people rummage through your grocery cart people put food on your plate people call you fat to your face you blow your nose and your snot is black (coal is used in some cities and the air is full of smoke) your water is turned off you can’t flush your toilet people get up close and personal (Our sense of personal space is different from theirs) people jump in front of you in line or you get pushed out of the way people randomly shout out, “Hallo!” and then giggle cars, buses, bikes and mule carts do not wait for you to cross the street you end up driving with a taxi driver who seems to have a death wish your empty or near empty glass is refilled to the brim someone […]

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