Tag: teaching abroad

Benefits of Teaching in Korea

The benefits of teaching in Korea are excellent. Korea is one of the most financially rewarding places to teach in all of Asia and you will not be disappointed as a teacher here.

Contract Renewal in Korea

Contract renewal in Korea can be a daunting event as you won’t know if they want you for a second year until they ask. This is something I experienced recently as I came to the end of my first year with EPIK.

Discipline in a Chinese University

Discipline in a Chinese University takes on a different form to the discipline I was used to implementing in an ESL class. Most students at universities are very motivated and want to study very hard. However, you may find some students in your university have issues with discipline, motivation, or responsibility.

Taipei Day Trips: Sun Moon Lake – Part 2

Sun Moon Lake is a must visit landmark in Taiwan that pulls in many visitors every year. The location is easy to access from Taipei and navigating your way round is made simple. Our Taiwan travel writer Vadim brings you the second part of his journey below.

Struggling ESL Students

Struggling ESL students will be something that every teacher faces, and it is important that you help them in the right way. If you are lucky enough to have an ESL class that is all at the same level, enjoy it!

Taipei Day Trips: Sun Moon Lake

Sun Moon Lake is easily accessible from Taipei, despite people saying that it just isn’t feasible. People will tell you that it will be too rushed, you will be too tired, and it just won’t be worth it. Well, if you’re willing to spend a little bit more money and wake up early, it’s completely possible.

Quick Filler Activities for ESL Classes

Filler activities are essential and every good ESL teacher has a handful (or more!) of simple, no-set-up filler activities for when a lesson finishes super early. But sometimes you don’t have ten or fifteen minutes – or even five! – to go into a more elaborate activity.

Lesson Planning with no Benchmarks

Lesson planning is something that all teachers will have to do, but we are often confined to a course book or teachers guide, but what happens when you have no limits? where do you begin from there?