Weather in Thailand

Weather in Thailand

Thailand’s climate is subtropical throughout most of the country, leading to year-round hot and humid conditions. 
During the hottest months of the year, temperatures regularly top 40° C (105° F). Even during the cooler “winter” season you can expect daily highs to be around 30° C  (86° F).

Things do cool off occasionally. Temperatures in the north can sometimes reach 10° C (50° F) at night, so bringing a few long-sleeve shirts for these cool days is advised. It is only in the high mountains that you will find temperatures dropping to freezing or below.

Although the temperature and humidity varies slightly across the different seasons, it is the amount of rainfall that really defines the seasons in Thailand.

Seasons In Northern, North-Eastern, and Central Thailand

The majority of Thailand has a sub-tropical climate. Monsoon winds create three distinct seasons through most of the country. The dates of these seasons can vary a bit from region to region.

Summer

Typically lasting from March to June, Thai summers aren’t for the faint of heart! Little rainfall, high humidity, and temperatures that can reach 40 °C characterize this season. Even at night, there isn’t much respite from the heat.

Rainy Season

July through October marks the rainy season. This doesn’t mean four months of constant downpours, though. Days usually start off sunny, with thunderstorms and heavy rains arriving in the afternoon or evening. The rain often offers some relief from the summer heat. Flash floods are common in the flatter Central region, including Bangkok.

Winter

While hardly comparable to the icy, snowy winters in many countries, this is the season when Thailand “cools off.” From November to February, daily humidity drops to 50% – 60%, and temperatures stay at a relatively comfortable 30 – 35 °C. The winter months are Thailand’s most pleasant season.

Seasons In Southern Thailand


Southern Thailand is located on the Malay peninsula, and has a tropical climate. As in the rest of Thailand, temperatures tend to remain fairly constant throughout the year, with hot, humid days and nights. 

The seasons of Southern Thailand are less distinct than the seasons in the rest of Thailand. In general, there is a dry season and a rainy season, but the dates of the monsoon rains vary greatly among different parts of the peninsula.

Rainy Season

May to October is the rainy season on the western side. On the eastern side, this season typically runs from September to December. Short, intense daily downpours characterize this season.

Dry Season

In Phuket and the western side of Southern Thailand, the dry season runs from November to March. The cooler temperatures and low humidity of this season makes it the most comfortable part of the year.

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